Hey! Manchester promotes gigs by folk, Americana and experimental bands from around the world in Manchester, England. Read more here, see below for our latest shows, check out our previous shows, contact us, or join our mailing list, above.

Upcoming shows: Jesse Malin... Adrian Crowley... A.A. Williams... Anna B Savage... Holy Moly & The Crackers... Sebastian Plano... Chloe Foy... Erland Cooper... Scott Matthews... Francis of Delirium... King Hannah... Jesse Marchant... Dog Daisies... Fuzzy Lights... bdrmm... The Burning Hell... Haiku Salut... Ben Caplan... Joep Beving... Mik Artistik’s Ego Trip... Will Varley... Sam Kelly & The Lost Boys... Willy Mason... Saint Sister... Lindsay Munroe... Natalie Bergman... Seatbelts... Moulettes... Skinny Lister... Lauren Housley... Penelope Isles... Rachel Sermanni... The Dears... Peggy Sue... Admiral Fallow... Lubomyr Melnyk... Kaia Kater... We Were Promised Jetpacks... BC Camplight... James Yorkston... Tommy Alexander... Rachel Baiman... Aoife O’Donovan... Brendan Benson... Heartless Bastards... The Surfing Magazines... Josh Rouse + Vetiver... Smoke Fairies... Douglas Dare... Efterklang... Dana Gavanski... Beans on Toast... The Sheepdogs... Roddy Woomble... The Weather Station... Sam Amidon... Robyn Hitchcock... The Beths... Pictish Trail... La Luz... William Fitzsimmons... The Besnard Lakes... Tré Burt... Andy Shauf... The Lovely Eggs... The Handsome Family...

When: 8pm on Wednesday 29 September 2021
Where: Night & Day Cafe, 26 Oldham St, Manchester, M1 1JN

PLEASE NOTE: This show has been postponed until September 2021. All other details are the same, and original tickets remain valid.

We’re delighted to be welcoming Jesse Malin back to Night & Day!

Jesse Malin — whom the Times says ‘writes vivid songs with killer tunes and sings them with scary conviction’ — and Lucinda Williams — the southern troubadour once named ‘America’s best songwriter’ by Time magazine — first met in the early 2000s at a jazz club in NYC’s West Village. In a joint 2017 Rolling Stone interview, the two discussed their ‘shared love of miscreants, misfits, the misunderstood and the mysteries of everyday lives binds them across the Mason-Dixon line’.

‘From the early frontier days of hardcore in New York to all the punk rock and singer/songwriter touring,’ says Malin, ‘it’s all been about survival and reinvention. I wanted to make an open-sounding record with the space to tell these stories. I like to write about characters and people I meet along the way. The dreamers, schemers, hustlers, romantics, lovers, leavers and believers.’ Many of the dreamers, schemers and so on from Jesse’s own life contribute to Sunset Kids, his new album of highly personal songs being released 30 August 2019 on Wicked Cool Records.

Sunset Kids first took shape at The Hollywood Bowl, when Jesse accepted Lucinda’s invitation to see her open for what turned out to be Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers’ final concert. The bittersweet experience inspired one of the new album’s highlights, Shining Down, a rainy day jangle about ‘keeping alive the spirits of the ones we’ve lost’. During that same visit, the idea came about of three-time Grammy-winning Lucinda producing Jesse’s next record.

‘Lucinda has a great eye for finding the beauty in broken things and a knack for always picking the right take. Once she started dancing in the control room, we knew we had it.’

In addition to this rare turn in the producer’s chair for Williams, she co-wrote and sang on the evocative country-flavoured Room 13, which Malin calls ‘the heart of the record in a lot of ways, about those meditative moments far away from home, where you’re forced to reflect on the things that really matter’.

The album also features Chemical Heart, an upbeat pop basher located at a mythical point on Queens Boulevard where Paul Simon and The Ramones intersect, namechecking Bernie Taupin and Jake LaMotta among others. Shane is a gentle ballad about one of his heroes, the lovably shambolic Shane MacGowan of The Pogues.

‘My first album, The Fine Art Of Self-Destruction, was about finding glory in the wreckage,’ says Malin of the album which was upon release Uncut’s Album of the Month. ‘Sunset Kids is about owning it. The failures, the victories, the moments. And moving up from there.’

After reflecting on his life while walking the streets of London, jamming riffs in an East Village basement and writing songs in Florida hotel rooms while visiting his ailing father, the ambitious 14-song album was recorded on both coasts between the two artists’ touring schedules.

It opens with the pre-apocalyptic confession Meet Me At The End Of The World Again, which includes backing vocals by Malin confidante and collaborator Joseph Arthur. Another key guest contribution comes courtesy of Green Day’s Billie Joe Armstrong, who co-wrote and sang on Strangers & Thieves.

‘Billie Joe was in town and I showed him where we hung out when we were kids in the hardcore days,’ Malin recalls. ‘A couple days later, I got a text and he had finished the song. He went into the details of his experience in the Bay Area with that scene, and also my experiences, which were very parallel in New York.’

Those early days found a young Jesse ‘riding the subway trains from Queens to the record stores and nightclubs in dirty, pre-Disney New York City’ and never looking back. His band Heart Attack put out the first New York hardcore single God Is Dead when Malin was 14 years old. He later went on to acclaim as the frontman for the fast and loud D Generation, whose albums were produced by Ric Ocasek, Tony Visconti and David Bianco.

Bianco is one of the Sunset Kids referenced in the album’s title. The engineer, who won a Grammy for his pristine sonics on Tom Petty’s Wildflowers and produced the first major-label release of Jesse’s career, passed away suddenly after overseeing the initial sessions for Sunset Kids in his L.A. studio.

‘Playing music is something I need to do. Singing under those hot lights every night is a great exorcism. We get to put together this pirate ship of characters and go around the world making trouble and singing our guts out.’

As the line in crucial cut When You’re Young says, ‘Don’t waste your life on things that don’t get better’. Malin concludes: ‘It’s about finding ways to survive and navigate through all this stuff. Being compassionate and loving in a world that will break your heart. But you’re still here. You wake up again and put one foot in front of the other and live every day like it could be your last.’

Tour support comes from Kris Gruen. Kris Gruen writes songs about grown-up life infused with a mystic wonder, softening the world’s sharp edges like a glass of exceptionally fine bourbon. Kris grew up steeped in classic records. His Americana influenced new folk is grounded in the tradition of great narrative songwriters like Cat Stevens and Paul Simon and yet Kris’s voice is strikingly current. A New York City native who’s put down roots in Vermont, Kris effortlessly blends sagacious wit and emotional depth. It was in Vermont’s rural backcountry — the woods, mountains, and fields that surround his family’s organic farm — that Kris Gruen began writing his fifth studio album, Welcome Farewell.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 7.30pm on Wednesday 29 September 2021
Where: Gullivers, 109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW

We’re excited to be working with Adrian Crowley!

One stormy night in Ireland, Adrian Crowleys brother brought home a wounded crow. After taking care of it for a time, the crow flew away on its own, leaving an impression behind: Crowley wrote a story, which would later become the aptly titled Crow Song on this, his brand new record & ninth studio album The Watchful Eye of the Stars. He sings, ‘And I was joyous for you, but shattered none-the-less.’

Suffused with a hazy and surreal quality, Crowley describes Watchful Eye’s poignant narratives as those which insisted themselves upon him. After the fact, it seemed these songs came to him more or less fully formed. ‘It’s a beautiful and mysterious thing,’ he says. Perhaps it is a tendency to hold onto memories (‘It’s taken me so long to write to you / Well I just couldn’t find a pen,’ he laments in Bread and Wine), that allows him to unleash them lyrically in completion. For Crowley, the creative process is an organic event rather than a practice he feels compelled to regulate or control. He approaches lyrics much like he does short story writing. ‘The songs straddle the conscious and subconscious world and some are even psychedelic in my mind, but to me they are all at once true stories and born of another place,’ he shares.

In making the album, Crowley moved between studio and at home recording, while John Parish (Aldous Harding, PJ Harvey) produced. The pair worked from tracks made initially by Crowley on a charity shop three-quarter-size nylon string guitar or Mellotron: ‘In this way, John wanted to keep some of the magic of that first take’, says Crowley. Contradictions and complexities are left intact, initial recordings were limited to one or two takes, and the songs feel more like a dream recounted upon waking.

Special guest is Katell Keineg. Katell Keineg was born in Brittany and was brought up first there and then in Wales. After graduating from the London School of Economics she moved to Ireland and started gigging, before re-locating to New York in 1992. She was quickly embraced by the scene around St Mark’s Place’s now legendary Sin-é, building her reputation for ‘conveying a nearly beatific sense of joy in performance’ (Los Angeles Times).  In 1993 she released a seven-inch single, Hestia (‘arcane and beautiful, one of the most extraordinary songs – Mojo) on Bob Mould’s SOL Records label. That same year, Keineg sang on Iggy Pop’s American Caesar. He passed a copy of Hestia on to Elektra Records, which led to a deal with the label and the release of her acclaimed debut album Ô Seasons Ô Castles in 1994. Keineg’s subsequent albums include Jet (Elektra, 1997), High July (Megaphone Music, 2004) and, most recently, At The Mermaid Parade (Honest Jon’s, 2010).

‘There’s a theory that certain musical frequencies affect people emotionally. Katell Keineg has found them. It’s damn near impossible to listen to her earthy and ethereal voice without feeling the spirit move you’ – Rolling Stone

‘Keineg’s songs abound with rich melodic motifs [and] capture everything that her followers have long cherished about Keineg – vocals that alternately soar and crack, lyrics both allusive and direct, rough-hewn, carefree, ramshackle folk arrangements that dance with abandon and are resolutely uncontainable’ – The Sunday Times

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from Dice.fm, WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 7.30pm on Thursday 30 September 2021
Where: Hallé St Peter’s, 40 Blossom Street, Ancoats, Manchester, M4 6BF

PLEASE NOTE: This show has been postponed until September 2021. All other details are the same, and original tickets remain valid. 

We’re delighted to working with A.A. Williams for the first time!

Making her stage debut in April 2019 and selling out her first headline show at London’s prestigious Southbank Centre less than a year later, A.A. Williams has hit the ground running. Similarly, the acclaim for her performances and her music has been unanimous from the start. After one self-titled EP and the 10-inch vinyl collaboration Exit in Darkness with Japanese post-rockers MONO, the London-based singer-songwriter has signed to Bella Union and made a stunning debut album, Forever Blue.

A rapturous blend of post-rock and post-classical, Forever Blue smoulders with uncoiling melodies and haunted atmospheres, shifting from serenity to explosive drama, often within the same song. Williams is a fantastic musician as well as songwriter, playing the guitar, cello and piano, and her voice has the controlled delivery of a seasoned chanteuse whilst still channelling the rawest of emotions.

Forever Blue is named after a song that didn’t make the album’s final cut, ‘but it still encapsulated these songs,’ Williams explains. ‘It sounded timeless and in the right place.’ The album’s threads encapsulate the anxieties and addiction of love and loss with haunting detail, for example Glimmer (‘I wasn’t meant to see the sun washed out and pale / I wait undone / I wasn’t meant to be the one hollow and hurt and meant for none’), though Williams admits the theme was shaped more by her subconscious than any grand plan.

‘The lyrics come at the end, they fall into place, rhythmically, and link together,’ she explains. ‘And then it’s my job to decipher what I’ve written! I want the words to get my point across but still let the listener map on their own experiences. I find it really therapeutic.’

Therapy is intrinsic to Williams’ approach: to not just express and unpick her feelings of longing and loss but to work through them. ‘Verbalising something, you feel a weight has been lifted,’ she says. The transition can be mirrored in the dynamic shift from ‘quiet’ to ‘loud’, as on Glimmer and arguably at its most euphoric on Melt. ‘There’s something very satisfying and elating about songs that have that drop in them, to stomp on the guitar pedal on and let it all out.’

It’s testament to Williams’ skills, and those of husband and bassist Thomas Williams, that Forever Blue’s commanding sound was largely captured at the couple’s two-bedroom flat in North London. Drums by Geoff Holroyde were added at engineer Adrian Hall’s studio in South London, with guest vocals from Johannes Persson (Cult Of Luna), who adds his deep-trawling growl to Fearless (‘he sounds like Tectonic plates moving,’ Williams feels), Fredrik Kihlberg (Cult Of Luna) on Glimmer and Tom Fleming (ex-Wild Beasts) on Dirt.

Williams can scarcely believe she’s in such exalted company, or that her band has toured with Cult Of Luna, Russian Circles, Explosions In The Sky, Nordic Giants and Sisters Of Mercy, whilst performing with MONO at their 10th anniversary show. It’s not because she doesn’t trust her own worth but that Williams only became a singer-songwriter by chance.

Having taken music lessons from the age of six and been immersed in classical music, Williams’ life was forever changed when she discovered Deftones in her mid-teens, ‘and after them, all things heavy,’ she recalls. ‘It was music that made me feel included, that tapped into me.’

Yet it was only years later, when she found a guitar in the street with a note attached, ‘please take me, just needs work,’ that Williams started playing guitar, and only started writing songs as a way of learning how to play. ‘I wrote in different styles to find a sound I was comfortable with,’ she says. ‘Likewise, with singing. I’d never before thought of singing with a microphone in front of other people. It’s been quite a journey.’

That journey was thrown off course by the Coronavirus lockdown, but Williams’ response has been the Songs From Isolation video project, solo renditions of songs suggested by her fans. At the time of writing, she has performed Radiohead’s Creep (‘to take on a song like that, you either have to be brave or dumb, and I thought, let’s be brave!’), Gordon Lightfoot’s If You Could Read My Mind and Nick Cave’s Into Your Arms.

As Songs From Isolation keeps posting intimate messages from a place of solitude, Forever Blue will spread the news of A.A. Williams’ extraordinary talent far and wide – and once lockdown is over, she and her band will be taking the next steps on her journey by touring the record. She’s already come so far but this story is only just beginning.

Local support comes from Elle Mary. Drawn to the communicative and bonding qualities of plainsong but explorative beyond its stylistic connotations; enough of a pack member to want a band yet also keen to imbue a sense of solitude through her music, Elle Mary is an artist who operates best when balancing conflicting instincts. It’s what lies beneath the subtle tension that slightly tugs at the heart of her slowcore minimalism.

Hallé St Peter’s, located on Blossom Street in Ancoats, is a Grade II-listed, deconsecrated church, which was built in 1859. Having stood empty for decades, it was recently restored to provide rehearsal and recording space for the Hallé orchestra.

This show is sold as unreserved seating. This show is a co-promotion with Form.

Age restriction: 14+. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 8pm on Wednesday 6 October 2021
Where: Night & Day Cafe, 26 Oldham St, Manchester, M1 1JN

PLEASE NOTE: Due to exceptional demand, this show was upgraded from the Castle Hotel to Night & Day Cafe – and has now sold out! All other details remain the same, except doors now open at 8pm. Original tickets remain valid.

We’re delighted to be working with Anna B Savage!

Making art is a bold thing, a statement. Usually a full stop, sometimes an exclamation point. But it’s bolder still when it’s a question mark. London singer-songwriter Anna B Savage makes question-mark-music, captivating and powerful, navigating various recurring themes including female sexuality, self-doubt … and birds.

Often questioning the validity of her own thoughts and feelings, her songs are heavy with unanswered queries. Is this even real? Do we have what I think we have? How did I get to this point? Is anyone listening? Or the record’s opening and elemental question: “Do I understand this?”.

Yet these questions are buoyed by her ability to conjure melodies and lyrics so devastatingly candid, vulnerable and honest, that somehow still manage to be bewitchingly charming, utterly modern and often funny.

This is seen over and over again on her debut full-length record, A Common Turn. “For me, ‘a common turn’ is those moments of decision where you think ‘I’m not taking this anymore, whether it’s the way someone else is treating you or the what you’re treating yourself” Savage explains. Playing on this, “A Common Tern”, a song on the second half of the album, is about Savage escaping toxicity, initially by getting away from a toxic relationship she had with her partner at the time and then the toxic relationship she had built with herself. The moment Savage decided she needed to change coincided with the sighting of the titular common tern.

Savage saw the freedom the bird offered and became fascinated with them “They’re actual dinosaurs and we just think they’re normal. The huge journeys they do, their ever presence, in one way or another. They are at once familiar and yet so strange and weird: they can fly ffs. I love watching them too, counting them on walks and in gardens. I’d become a bit of a twitcher: I was going on birdwatching holidays and listening to Tweet of the Day all the time, and I did some bird ringing. Turns out they’ve always held something of a fascination for me: I found an old school notebook from when I was nine and I’d written a poem about an albatross. I do remember being a bit (completely) taken by albatrosses after reading The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner at school.”

From a young age, Savage has also always been surrounded by music. The daughter of two classical singers, Savage spent her childhood birthdays in the green room at the Royal Albert Hall: her birthday coincides with the day Bach died, and her parents were always booked to perform for the Bach Prom. Her 2015 EP was deeply intriguing as a project, it contained four songs, all of which paired Savage’s deep, rich voice with lyrics rife with insecurity and unfinished business and was released with very little accompanying information about the artist. EP quickly drew the attention of Father John Misty (who she now affectionately calls her “music dad”) and later Jenny Hval, both of whom brought Savage out on European tours.

The success of the EP caught Savage off guard, triggering a form of imposter syndrome, stifling her writing and ultimately affecting her mental health. At her lowest point Savage wasn’t sure if she could continue making music. At one stage her well-meaning parents started to cut out arts administration jobs for her and put them on the bed for when she arrived home.

In the five years between her first release and this forthcoming one, Savage ended the bad relationship mentioned previously (“I was so small by the end of it”), took up odd jobs, moved across the world twice, got herself a lot of therapy and eventually built herself from the ground up again. “I sat in the sun and read, and I ran my book club, and I went swimming in the Ladies Pond, and I went on trips, and I got drunk, started smoking again and going to parties, and I started dancing again and seeing my friends and, most miraculous of all, I started to like myself.”

For the last three years, focused and reenergised, Savage wrote music for her debut album, stitching together influences and references “One month I printed out all the lyrics, blu-tacked them to my wall, and drew lines between each corresponding idea. Making sure I’d lyrically covered all the themes I wanted to, linking ideas, deleting repeats, and making me look like a literary serial killer”. The album is littered with personal and cultural references (Rocky Horror Picture Show, the Spice Girls, female pleasure, mental health, and a ceramic owl mug by Scottish alt-rock legend Edwyn Collins, among others), all of which are now sewn into her music like talismans.

Savage got in touch with William Doyle (FKA 2014 Mercury Prize nominee East India Youth – ), having seen his social media post asking artists to contact him if they wanted to experiment together. From their first meeting, William provided ambitious yet elegant production to the demos Anna brought him, and ultimately gave a definitive shape to the record she had at one point deemed officially impossible to finish. Theirs is a blending of earth and industry, of human feeling and mechanised deconstruction of expectations and barriers. As a pair, they were able to make a record that is, in Savage’s words, “about learning, adapting, growing, being earnest and trying really f***ing hard.”

Savage’s music is deeply vulnerable, without being submissive. The subject matter could weigh these songs down, but instead they soar as she lays claim to her own fragility. There’s an intoxicating catharsis woven through the album and the stories she tells are of taking up space, finding connections, and owning the power in not knowing all the answers. Hers are songs for anyone who thinks hard, feels deeply, and asks big questions.

Tour support comes from Rachael Lavelle. Rachael Lavelle is an Irish singer and composer who captivates audiences with a music that is both intensely visceral and darkly humorous. Merging classical and contemporary influences, her hypnotic live performances blend electronic soundscapes with spoken word and acrobatic vocals. She has performed at festivals including this year’s SxSW showcase and has written for and collaborated with a wide range of artists such as Villagers, Crash Ensemble and Saint Sister. She is currently finishing her debut album.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from Dice.fm, WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 7pm on Thursday 7 October 2021
Where: Gorilla, 54-56 Whitworth Street West, Manchester M1 5WW

PLEASE NOTE: This show has been postponed and now takes at Gorilla, in October 2021. Original tickets will be valid and all other details remain the same.

We’re delighted to be bringing Holy Moly & The Crackers back to Manchester – this time, to Gorilla!

Holy Moly & The Crackers are the innovative and fiery folk-rockers from Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, who bombastically mash together unique flavours of soul, rock, indie and Balkan folk. However you describe them, one thing is sure – Holy Moly & The Crackers put on a raucous and feel good party, where everyone is invited, and have become renowned for their blazing live shows.

The band was formed almost by mistake, when Conrad Bird, Ruth Patterson and Rosie Bristow met at a house party in Leamington Spa of all places. They were in their late teens. Enamoured by Rosie’s party-prop accordion, the three decided to start playing music together – mainly stomping folk and drinking songs as an alternative to “SMACK” – Leamington’s main student club, that was the only other option for a night out.

Moving North, and nearly 10 years on, the band has grown into a rocking 6 piece: with Tommy Evans on drums, Nick Tyler on guitars and Jamie Shields on bass to provide the grunt and diesel. They have released 3 albums and launched their own record label, Pink Lane.

Slowly building a loyal and enthusiastic fanbase over the years, the six-piece first tasted success with the release of their 2nd album Salem, when lead single Cold Comfort Lane was picked up by Hollywood and used in the vibrant, stick-it-to-the-man blockbuster Oceans8 in 2018. Since then they have sold out shows across the UK and Europe and graced the stages of innumerable festivals (Glastonbury, Bestival, Colours Of Ostrava (CZ) to name 3 of many).

Working again with Salem producer, Matt Terry, they recorded and released their 3rd album Take A Bite in 2019, to raptured acclaim. Championed by Spotify, Radio X and singer-songwriter Frank Turner, it has been described as a “swaggering album that showcases a riotous blend of styles” (Louder Than War). Once again Holy Moly hit the road in full throttle, joining ‘shanty punks’ Skinny Lister on tour around Europe, before appearing at over 30 festivals, before finally undertaking a victorious headline lap of the UK, culminating in selling out their biggest show to date at Sage Gateshead on the banks of the Tyne. Ruth and Conrad also got married. It was a busy year!

2020 saw the band blasting out of the blocks with their new single Road To You, described as “a shot of espresso, that comes loaded and ready to work in a short, sharp shock” The band were set to play 27 dates across 10 countries on their biggest European tour to date, as well as support Frank Turner across France and Germany, and return to Glastonbury for its 50th anniversary. But, well, you know what happened next. Many of their dates have been postponed and rescheduled for 2021. In the mean-time, no doubt they will retreat into their crazy chocolate factory to conjure up a whole load of magical, insane musical treats.

This is a 14+ show. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult. This show is a co-promotion with Please Please You.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are also available from Dice.fmWeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 8pm on Saturday 9 October 2021
Where: St Michael’s, 36-38 George Leigh Street, Ancoats, Manchester, M4 5DG

We’re delighted to be working with Sebastian Plano again!

One afternoon in late November, 2019, Argentinian cellist, composer and producer Sebastian Plano woke from a short nap in his Berlin apartment. Switching his phone on, he was overwhelmed by a tsunami of texts, and his inbox, too, was swamped with emails. Scrolling through them, he discovered each offered congratulations, but the reason remained a mystery. Finally, he stumbled on the first message, which explained the tributes: his most recent album, Verve, had been nominated for a Grammy.

If Plano was stunned when he grasped the announcement’s significance, another surprise awaited him. “I was grateful and flattered,” he grins, before adding, “but I definitely don’t make New Age music!” In fairness, one of his work’s many strengths is that it’s unusually hard to categorise, and those voting must simply have felt compelled, one way or another, to recognise Verve’s considerable merits. But whatever their reasoning, if his third album was indeed exceptional – a filigree of gently stroked strings, rippling piano lines and eloquent electronica, it exists in its own dimension, its melancholy swathed in hope – SAVE ME NOT, his fourth album, shifts things to a whole new level. Recorded at nights in his Berlin studio, it finds him going to unprecedented, even greater extremes to satisfy his urge to express himself through the creation of ensemble music alone. “’I wanted,” he says, “to see how far I could go.”

Bending – and often rejecting – in seductively enigmatic style the principles with which the classically trained musician was raised, SAVE ME NOT pursues Plano’s pioneering, ethereal aesthetic with even more confidence, operating in a dream-world all its own, answerable only to his instincts. The results are elegant, vivid and sometimes even spiritual, with the Argentinian playing every note, layering each musical phrase one at a time. “This wasn’t a matter of control,” he clarifies, “but of being able to express what I want to the fullest extent. The whole album is just me: it’s about narrowing down the instruments to the minimum, and how much I can push myself to create an authentic, unique sonic world.”

In practise, this means arrangements have been distilled to just cello, piano and voice. “They’re sometimes processed electronically,” he elaborates, “but there’s no electronic instruments here, and I tend to be willing to use my voice only when the cello or piano cannot go further expressively.” Nonetheless, other inventive details are occasionally present, each a part of the act of making music: the striking of his cello’s body, his feet stamping the floor, even the squeak of his studio chair. Only one loop appears on the record starting the spectral title track. “It was recorded in 2012 in San Francisco,” Plano recalls, “and there was something about this piano loop that hypnotised me. It never left my mind, so I always knew it was eventually going to be part of something.”

In fact, this brief phrase turned out to be the starting point for SAVE ME NOT, simultaneously linking the new record to what he’s written before. If it appears to flout self-imposed rules, though, these – for free-spirited Plano, anyway, whose musical roots were frustratingly conventional – were made to be broken. Born in Rosario, Argentina, in 1985, he was raised by parents who perform in the city’s symphony orchestra, and having first played cello at the age of seven, he began writing his own music four years later. After turning 13, he spent two years taking eight-hour round trips to Buenos Aires for hour-long lessons with the country’s finest teacher, yet, despite subsequent, full scholarships from some of the world’s most prestigious institutes, he found himself increasingly dissatisfied. “Our day to day life is ruled by reality,” he says, “and I found myself fitting but not belonging in mine.”

Plano began to focus more and more on his own music, and soon discovered an increasingly irresistible thrill. In addition, the further he strayed from the scholarly doctrines instilled in him, the more euphoric he felt. “As we grow up,” he says, “we spend our lives having to blend in, so, as our personalities develop, it’s inevitable we start cultivating our own reality. But for me this grew until it made me realise I didn’t belong in the world of interpretations, playing Beethoven’s – or anyone else’s – music.”

Tour support comes from Tom Adams. Combining enveloping minimalism with a spellbinding falsetto, songwriter/producer Tom Adams conveys immense emotion utilising just a few elements. Masterfully balancing tactile acoustic and electronic instruments, Adams’ music is as expansive as it is elegantly peculiar. Receiving accolades for his wide-ranging output of synth-guided exploits, guitar led chamber pop, melancholic piano-ambient works, and moody film scores.

AGE RESTRICTION: This show is 14+. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are also available from Dice.fmWeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 7.30pm on Wednesday 13 October 2021
Where: Gullivers, 109 Oldham Street, Manchester, M4 1LW

We’re excited to be working with Chloe Foy once again – with guest Hannah Ashcroft!

Chloe Foy has shared the title-track from her forthcoming debut album, Where Shall We Begin. Arriving on 11 June, the album closes the chapter on a formative period for the Gloucestershire-via-Manchester songwriter. After losing her father to depression, Foy embarked on a ten-year-period where she followed her career path tirelessly whilst also dealing with the internal and external fallout from losing an influential figure so young.

The title-track is a microcosm of what makes Foy so special. It begins pensively with Foy’s poetry-like lyricism taking centre stage, before swelling into a hair-raising, choral harmony that gleams blindingly and brilliantly bright. Speaking of the track, Foy said: ‘This song is about the moment that the complexity of life dawns on you. When you lose people you love, you realise life isn’t what you hoped or expected it to be and feel quite betrayed by that. However, it’s also a nod to those who are around to comfort us and who bring us round to the idea that maybe it’ll be ok.’

Foy first started to attract attention as far back as 2013 when her debut single, In The Middle of the Night, was picked up by BBC 6 Music and Radio 2. Follow-up singles, Flaws and Asylum, brought huge streaming success – the latter is approaching 8.5 million Spotify plays – and festival appearances followed soon after – SXSW in 2018, Green Man and Cambridge Folk Festival in 2019.

Where Shall We Begin is the sound of someone who has spent years working away, content to only unleash their first full body of work when they, as an artist, were at their most complete. ‘For me, this album has come out of a decade of hard graft, trying to balance my craft with making a living, whilst taking my time to get it right. All whilst dealing with the fallout of a huge bereavement in my most formative years. I was finding it hard to work out who I was within this new, alien context of losing a parent,’ explains Foy.

Inspired by songwriters like Gillian Welch, Edith Piaf and Tyler Ramsay, and producers like Blake Mills and John Congleton, the resulting album revolves around Foy’s spine-tingling, pure vocals and her near perfect songwriting. Expect the melodies to lodge in your head for days.

Recorded at Pinhole Studios in Manchester, an army of musical collaborators dropped by to lend their embellishments to Foy’s patchwork; viola and harp contributions taking the work to a whole new level. Foy co-produced the record alongside musical collaborator Harry Fausing Smith, who is also responsible for the string arrangements.

The songs themselves are both incredibly empathetic and self-compassionate. And It Goes is about how her mother’s love remained unfaltering even as she came to terms with the loss of her soulmate, while stand-out Work of Art is about the warmth created for both songwriter and audience when a community of music lovers come together to spend their evening lost in song.

It all adds to make up for a soothing and incredibly vulnerable listen. An album that could both rock a baby to sleep, and, at the opposite end of the spectrum, inspire deep self-excavation and existential analysis. The kind of album that doesn’t come around very often. ‘These songs are my most inner and deepest secrets. The kind of things I only express to those closest to me, but for some reason in song, I can be open with the world.’

Special guest is Hannah Ashcroft. Hannah Ashcroft is a Manchester based singer/songwriter and guitarist based, fitting somewhere between the folk, indie and alternative genres. With a unique fingerpicking style influenced by the likes of John Martyn and Nick Drake, she combines intricate guitar parts and haunting melodies to explore themes of humanity, mythology and superstition.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from Dice.fm, WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

Attend on: Facebook


All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 7.30pm on Thursday 14 October 2021
Where: Hallé St Peter’s, 40 Blossom Street, Ancoats, Manchester, M4 6BF

PLEASE NOTE: This show has been postponed until October 2021 – and has since sold out! Original tickets are valid and all other details remain the same.

We’re delighted to welcoming Erland Cooper back – this time, to one of Manchester’s hidden gems.

Join Erland Cooper as he performs music exclusively from across his Orkney repertoire on a transportive, meditative, ‘magical and moving’ journey though the Scottish Highlands, its folklore, myth and mythology. This will be one of the last times to catch this special live show of his ‘An Orkney Triptych’ tour before he embarks on journeys anew.

Erland Cooper is a Scottish composer, producer and multi-instrumentalist originally from Stromness, Orkney. As a solo artist, he has released seven acclaimed albums, including a trilogy of work inspired by his childhood home, as well as themes of nature, landscape, community and time. His work combines field recordings with traditional orchestration and contemporary electronic elements.

Through music, words and cinematography he explores identity, memory, and place. He develops these themes further by partnering with well-known artists and writers. Cooper also works across mixed media projects including installation art, theatre and film.

‘At once calming and euphoric, with a beauty that’s its own justification’ – Uncut

Tour support comes from Hinako Omori. Hinako Omori is a musician and producer based in London, originally from Yokohama, Japan. Initially training to be a sound engineer, Hinako leapt into music full time after university as a keyboard player and programmer on stage and in the studio – some of the artists Hinako has worked with include EOB (Ed O’Brien), Georgia, Kae Tempest and James Bay.

Hinako’s debut EP Auraelia was released in November 2019 via Injazero Records. The tracks are a sonic exploration of space, haziness and transformation, building on layers of synths and vocals. Hinako has since released tracks on various compilations including Sisters of Sound’s SOS Music Volume 1 (in conjunction with !K7 and Dublab), collaborated with visual artist Cécile B. Evans on music for her installation Notations for an Adaptation of Giselle (welcome to whatever forever), exhibited at the Centre Pompidou, and composed music for Invisible Monsters and Tomato Soup, an animation on dreams during the pandemic.

Hallé St Peter’s, located on Blossom Street in Ancoats, is a Grade II-listed, deconsecrated church, which was built in 1859. Having stood empty for decades, it was recently restored to provide rehearsal and recording space for the Hallé orchestra.

This show is sold as unreserved seating.

Age restriction: 14+. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

Attend on: Facebook 


All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
Designed by ikram_zidane

When: 7.30pm on Saturday 16 October 2021
Where: St Michael’s, 36-38 George Leigh Street, Ancoats, Manchester, M4 5DG

PLEASE NOTE: This show has been postponed until October 2021. Original tickets remain valid and all other details are the same.

We’re delighted to be working with Scott Matthews for the first time – at St Michael’s in Ancoats!

If there’s one quality that defines the career of Scott Matthews it’s this: evolution.

The singer/songwriter has challenged himself creatively during a career that has been characterised by rare quality. As Matthews gears up for the release of his seventh studio album, new horizons loom into view as he finds different ways to cast a spell.

The quality of Matthews’ craft is a given. The Ivor Novello-winning artist is part of a lineage that includes such greats as Buckley and Drake, John Martyn and Paul Simon. With guitar in hand and a voice that conveys raw emotion, he has long been established as one of the world’s foremost purveyors of song.

Introspective and reflective, combining blues and folk, mixing the ethereal with the empyrean, Matthews is a musical alchemist who transforms base metal to gold. He has expanded his sonic palette while making his new record, introducing new moods and musical textures as he addresses universal truths.

Having broken through with the much-loved Passing Stranger and more recently mastered the delicate art of one-man-and-a-guitar music with sparse musicianship and an otherworldly falsetto, through the records Home Pt I, Home Pt II and The Great Untold, Matthews is travelling along new roads.

Waves of electronica are matched with big, chiming electric guitars as Matthews finds different colours for his canvass. His new work will be out later this year and it will be accompanied by a tour, during which he’ll revisit fan favourites from an extraordinary canon of work.

‘It’s been a welcome diversion to work on my seventh record. For the first time in the making of any of my records, I have given myself a very clear blueprint and can hear how every song should sound given the limitations I have set myself.’

Matthews new record will feel sparse with an air of electronic minimalism. There will be less instrumentation than on earlier works; with percussion, strings and woodwind being replaced by a world of emotive synthesisers and pulsing drum grooves. Rehearsing in his local church, he’s been testing himself, pushing himself far outside his normal comfort zone as he explores new sounds and ways of making music.

If you’re looking for examples, consider the career progressions of David Sylvian, Mark Hollis, Brian Eno or Thom Yorke, who all found new ways of working in an ever-changing world.

‘In many ways, it’s like starting again. I feel reborn in an oscillating world. The fact that the music is so different forces me to sing and write lyrics in a pleasingly unexpected way, it breathes a whole new energy into my approach and song-writing ethos. There’s a pulsating dynamic, which I’m captivated by.’

Matthews will tour the UK in November and play at a number of churches and unusual spaces with natural ambiences suited to his newfound lo-fi sounds. ‘It will be one man and a guitar with a wave of electronica washing over me. I am fascinated by thought provoking sounds and how they totally immerse the listener and encourage them to dig a little deeper into their being. I think these songs will prick people’s ears up. They’ll keep people on their toes and hopefully their electronic grace will sweep them off their feet too.’

Over 14 years and with his seventh album on the horizon, Matthews has continued to push the envelope with songs of breath-taking majesty. And now he is setting himself new challenges as his evolution takes a beautiful turn.

This is a seated show.

This will be one of the first public concerts in St Michael’s since its recent re-opening, having been closed since 2004. The Roman Catholic church was founded in 1859 and became the heart of the Little Italy Community in Ancoats.

AGE RESTRICTION: This show is 14+. Under 16s must be accompanied by an adult.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from Vinyl Exchange, WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

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All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
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When: 7.30pm on Tuesday 19 October 2021
Where: The Castle Hotel, 66 Oldham Street, Manchester M4 1LE

We’re delighted to be working with Francis of Delirium for the first time.

Born out of a bedroom, Francis of Delirium was created by 18-year-old Jana Bahrich (Vancouver, CA) who later invited drummer/producer Chris Hewett (Seattle, USA) to help her form an indie rock band. Based in Luxembourg, together they synthesise grunge and folk to deliver a powerful sound that supports Jana’s high energy vocals and her genuine passion to connect with each member of the audience; intimacy and vulnerability lie at the heart of her lyrics.

First appearing back in January with the instantaneous track Quit Fucking Around, they followed it up a few months later with the more reflective but equally potent Circles (‘An incredibly powerful catharsis, a controlled yet palpable expulsion of pain’ – The Line of Best Fit).

During this time however, world events have meant that Francis of Delirium haven’t been able to tour but determined not to be held back, their debut EP (All Change) is coming out on 19 June on Dalliance Recordings (Gia Margaret, Wilsen, Common Holly) with a firm promise to hit the road as soon as it’s deemed safe for them to do so.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from Dice.fm, WeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

Attend on: Facebook


All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.
Designed by ikram_zidane

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