Hey! Manchester promotes gigs by folk, Americana and experimental bands from around the world in Manchester, England. Read more here, see below for our latest shows, check out our previous shows, contact us, or join our mailing list, above.

Upcoming shows: The Burning Hell... Theme Park... Jolie Holland and Samantha Parton... The Rural Alberta Advantage... Half Waif... Andy Shauf... Elisa... The Handsome Family... Man & The Echo... Meilyr Jones... Mark Eitzel... Haley Bonar... Skinny Lister... Lowly... Jenn Grant... Angel Olsen...

When: 7.30pm on Saturday 17 October 2015
Where: The Eagle Inn, 19 Collier Street, Salford, M3 7DW

We’re excited to be working with La Luz once again!

La-Luz-Eagle-Salford

For most, a brush with death would be cause for retreat, reflection, and reluctance, but Seattle band La Luz found something different in it: resilience. Having survived a high-speed highway collision shortly after releasing their 2013 debut LP It’s Alive, La Luz, despite lasting trauma, returned to touring with a frequency and tirelessness that put their peers to shame. Over the past year-and-a-half of performing, the band arrived at a greater awareness of their music’s ability to whip eager crowds into a frenzy. In response, frontwoman Shana Cleveland’s guitar solos took on a more unhinged quality. The basslines (from newly installed member Lena Simon) became more lithe and elastic. Stage-dives and crowd-surfing grew to be as indelible a part of the La Luz live experience as their onstage doo-wop-indebted dance moves.

When it came time to record Weirdo Shrine, their second album – due out 7 August – the goal was to capture the band’s restless live energy and commit it to tape. In early 2015, Cleveland and co. adjourned to a surf shop in San Dimas, California where, with the help of producer/engineer Ty Segall, they realised this vision. Tracking most of the album live in shared quarters, La Luz chose to leave in any happy accidents and spur-of-the-moment flourishes that occurred while recording. Cleveland’s newly fuzzed-up guitar solos – which now incorporated the influence of Japanese Eleki players in addition to the twang of American surf and country – were juxtaposed against the group’s most angelic four-part harmonies to date. The organs of Alice Sandahl and the drumming of Marian Li Pino were granted extra heft and dimension. Thematically, Cleveland channeled Washingtonian poet Richard Brautigan on You Disappear and Oranges, and sought inspiration from Charles Burns’ Seattle-set graphic novel Black Hole.

The resulting album is a natural evolution of the band’s self-styled ‘surf noir’ sound – a rawer, turbo-charged sequel that charts themes of loneliness, infatuation, obsession and death across eleven tracks, from the opening credits siren song of Sleep Till They Die to the widescreen, receding-skyline send-off of Oranges and its bittersweet epilogue, True Love Knows.

In describing Weirdo Shrine, Segall remarked that it gave him a vision of a ‘world… burning with colours [he’d] never seen, like mauve that is living’. In Oranges, the Brautigan poem that inspired the aforementioned track of the same name, the poet writes of a surreal ‘orange wind / that glows from your footsteps’. These hue-based allusions are apt: the sound of La Luz is (appropriately) vibrant, and alive with a kaleidoscopic passion. Weirdo Shrine finds them at their most saturated and cinematic.

‘A uniquely haunting – albeit occasionally unintentional – spin on the innocent guitar-driven pop of the late ’50s and early ’60s, nudging the sock hop vibes of Dick Dale and the Shirelles into a darker parallel dimension’ – Paper Magazine

‘Imagine all of the Shangri-La’s trying, precariously, to balance on top of Link Wray’s surfboard’ – Pitchfork

Main support comes from Elle Mary & The Bad Men. Drawn to the communicative and bonding qualities of ‘folk’ but explorative beyond its stylistic connotations; enough of a pack member to want a band yet also keen to imbue a sense of solitude through her music, Elle Mary is an artist who operates best when balancing conflicting instincts. It’s what lies beneath the subtle tension that slightly tugs at the heart of her and The Bad Men’s acoustically-webbed slowcore minimalism.

Completing the bill are Sprinters. Formally Neil Jarvis Band, Sprinters are a surf rock band from Manchester. Initially a solo recording project, the now four-piece evolved into a full band. Taking influence from American indie rock bands, the band are currently recording their debut LP.

This show is a co-promotion with Comfortable On A Tightrope.

Buy tickets now. Tickets are available from Common (no booking fee), Piccadilly Records, Vinyl Exchange, Billetto.co.ukWeGotTickets.comTicketline.co.uk and on 0871 220 0260.

Attend on: Facebook | Last.fm



All shows are 18+ unless otherwise stated.

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